Animals in history

Animals in history

Animals have always been considered amazing creatures that pleased, admired and brightened the most difficult periods of our life. Some of them managed to commit acts and even feats that will be immortalized for a long time in our memory. We will tell about them today.

Marmot Panksaton Phil. The world's most famous Pansaton Phil, also known by the full name Pansaton, the Seer of the Seers, the Sage of the Sages and the Greatest Forecaster of Weather, traditionally predicted the weather every year on February 2, the Groundhog Day, starting in 1886. Surprisingly, some people believe that the same groundhog is engaged in this to this day. Since these animals live an average of only ten years, the groundhog would have to take regular doses of the elixir of life in order to live for more than a century. The marmot is cared for by a mysterious group of people called the “inner circle”, and by the beginning of the prediction ceremony they also bring a marmot and tuxedo. Weather forecasting using the woodchuck probably comes from German superstition: if the woodchuck leaves its burrow on February 2 and sees its shadow, then the winter will last another six weeks.

1

Dog Like.A young stray dog ​​named Laika, a wanderer from the streets of Moscow, was destined to become the first astronaut dog. Unfortunately, Sputnik-2, in which Laika was sent into orbit, did not pass all the necessary tests, since Soviet President Nikita Khrushchev wanted to launch a satellite on the day of the 40th anniversary of the October Revolution - November 7, 1957. According to the official version, Laika died from a lack of oxygen six days after the start of the journey, but in 2002 it became known that the poor thing lasted only six or seven hours, after which she died from overheating and stress, but a monument to a small dog was installed in Star City .

2

Lioness Elsa. Lioness Elsa attracted public attention after the publication of the book naturalist Joy Adamson "Born Free". The life of the little lion cub was hard: the mother was killed by the huntsman, husband Joy - George, because she attacked him. Fortunately, George took Elsa and other lion cubs, her brothers and sisters, to himself, and went out to send them to zoos. The young lioness Elsa lived in the Joy family as a pet, but people gradually prepared her to return to her natural habitat.Elsa gave birth to three cubs who had fully adapted to life in the wild, but Elsa herself, unfortunately, died at the age of five from harmlessness - a tick-borne disease. George Adamson and his assistants buried Elsa and staged a farewell salute at her grave - 20 rifle volleys.

3

Chimpanzee ham Chimpanzee Ham was the first hominid in space and, fortunately, his story is happier than that of the first astronaut dog, which we will tell about a little later. Named after the Holloman Aerospace Medical Center, Ham was one of six monkeys trained to pull levers in response to flashing lights during a spacecraft flight. Ham was chosen by NASA and launched into space in the Mercury capsule, he made his short journey on January 31, 1961 - he managed to overcome 250 km in 16.5 minutes. The flight had to be interrupted due to problems with oxygen, but Ham recovered three hours after the end of the journey - he even ate an apple and a half of an orange immediately after leaving the capsule. After Ham lived more than 17 years in the National Zoo in Washington.

4

Turtle Jonathan. The tortoise Jonathan is at least 179 years old, and he is the oldest known animal in the world.It is difficult to verify, but there is photographic evidence: the picture was taken during the Anglo-Boer War in 1900 on St. Helena, where Jonathan still lives. At that time he was at least 50 years old, and possibly all 70, so now the turtle is at least 179 years old. Jonathan enjoys life in the company of five female turtles, and although he is blind in one eye, age does not seem to be an obstacle for him: he loves attention and is still aggressive enough to protect his young wives from sexual harassment of other males.

5

Mongoose Mr. Magu. On November 15, 1962, a snake hunter, a mongoose named Mr. Magu, was taken from the Dulut zoo. The US Conservation Service for Fish Resources and Wildlife was sentenced to death or deportation to his homeland, India. The story caused a national scandal. A foreign sailor passed it to the zoo, but the Service decided that there was no place for the Mongoose in the United States. In the end, Mr. Magu was given a reprieve. In one weekend, the hapless predator was visited by thousands of people, and many wrote to the authorities, saying that it was necessary to get rid of the beast: a mongoose could run away and live in a region where he had no natural enemies.In the end, the mongoose decided not to kill, and he lived the rest of his life at the zoo, feeding on bird eggs. The mongoose died in 1968.

6

Cat Sam. The unsinkable Sam was a wonderful cat that survived three shipwrecks during the Second World War. The first sinking ship from which Sam was saved (at that time his name was Oscar) was Bismarck, sunk during a naval battle on May 27, 1941. Sam survived, although 2,000 crew members died. Then the cat got on the British battleship "Cossack", in the same year hit by a torpedo and exploded. All 159 crew members died, but the cat survived, swam across Gibraltar and climbed ashore. The cat was given the name Unsinkable Sam (fortunately for cats it doesn't matter what their names are) and went to the ship Ark Royal, which also ended up with a torpedo, but all the crew members except one were saved. Sam, on the other hand, was found "angry but unscathed" drifting in the middle of the ocean on a broken board. Fortunately, after that the cat was no longer taken to the ships, and he lived to old age in the house of a sailor in Belfast, where he died by his death in 1955.

7

Dove Sher Ami. The US Army owes much to the pigeon Sher Ami, who did a lot for military operations in France during the First World War.During the bloody battles, the British forces held post pigeons to exchange important information - there were 600 such birds in all, and one of them was Sher Ami. He delivered 12 important messages over several months in 1918, and made his last flight on the afternoon of October 4, 1918, during the Battle of Argon. The corps was under fire, and Major Whittlesey sent Sher Ami with a small note tied to his paw. He was seriously wounded in the chest, blind in one eye and with one bird shot out of his leg, managed to reach the destination and thereby save the lives of 200 people. After this flight, the pigeon was cured and even made him a wooden prosthesis instead of a lost paw, but he died less than a year later.

8

Horse of Morocco. The dancing horse of Morocco was so famous in 1591 in the United Kingdom that it was immortalized by Shakespeare in the comedy “Vain efforts of love” in which the playwright mentioned a dancing horse. The horse could do a lot, including counting coins, stamping with hoofs, dancing on two or four legs, and bowing to the queen when it was needed. The horse was also considered to be a psychic, since it moved its legs in a special way in response to certain questions.This skill, however, almost cost the horse and its owner, William Banks, life when they were accused of witchcraft, convicted and sentenced to death. But, apparently, the judge changed his mind when the horse knelt before him, asking him to save the life of her master, and pardoned both. Little is known about their future life, but, apparently, they lived comfortably on the income received from previous speeches.

9

Elephant Jumbo. Jumbo was born in 1861. He was also taken as a baby elephant from the French Sudan to the Paris Zoo, and in four years he was transported from there to the London Zoo. When he became grumpy and uncontrollable, Jumbo was sold to R. T. Barnum’s circus for $ 10,000 to the dismay of the British public. Queen Victoria received more than 100 thousand letters with a request to fit in the incident. But the elephant seemed to be quite happy in Barnum’s Circus, until he died from the terrible injury sustained by the explosion of the train three years later.

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  • Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history

    Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history Animals in history