9 fictional stories predicting the future

9 fictional stories predicting the future

The statement “Truth is more fantastic than fiction” is only partly true. Before you - nine works of various authors and screenwriters, who predicted the future with amazing accuracy.

1. "The Tale of the Adventures of Arthur Gordon Pym" - a novel that predicted the death of a real person with the same name as that of a fictional character

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Edgar Allan Poe

In 1838, Edgar Allan Poe wrote his "A Tale of the Adventures of Arthur Gordon Pym." One of the characters, a rebel named Richard Parker, was the victim of monstrous cannibalism.

All the rebels in the book were thrown overboard, Parker was spared by one to help control the ship. Then the ship was wrecked, and the rest of the crew were left without food. Parker suggested that he himself and three other survivors would pull straws - one would have to sacrifice in order to save the rest. He pulled out a short straw and was eaten alive.

In 1884, the Reseda yacht departed from Southampton, England, for Australia and sank.The four survivors, including 17-year-old boy Richard Parker, managed to escape - they sailed in a boat. When they ran out of food and water, they had to drink their own urine, and, finally, three men killed and ate Parker - just like his fictional namesake.

In 2001, the writer Yann Martel paid tribute to both the fictional and the real Parker. In his novel Life of Pi, the Bengali tiger who survived the shipwreck was named Richard Parker.

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Frame from the movie “Life of Pi”

2. "Futility, or the Death of Titan" - a novel in which a fictional ship sank just like "Titanic"

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In 1898, Morgan Robertson wrote the novel The Vainness or Crash of Titan. The book describes a trip on a ship called "Titan", which eventually collided with an iceberg and sunk - in 1912, the same thing happened with the Titanic. The similarity between reality and fiction is striking:
Both ships had a triple screw;
The length of the "Titanic" was 268 meters, weight - more than 53,000 tons, it was considered almost "unsinkable." The length of the "Titan" - 243 meters, weight - more than 75,000 tons, and he, too, was described in the book as "unsinkable";
There were only 16 lifeboats on the Titanic, plus four folding Engelhardt boats, and on the Titan there were 24;
The Titanic was moving at a tremendous speed - 22.5 knots, and collided with an iceberg on starboard on the night of April 14, 1912 in the North Atlantic, 740 km from Newfoundland. "Titan" was moving at a speed of 25 knots, collided with an iceberg on the starboard side of April in the North Atlantic at 740 km from Newfoundland;
The Titanic sank, and more than half of all 2,200 passengers and crew members died. There were 2,500 people on the Titan, and half of them drowned.

3. “The Freed World” - a book by HG Wells, who predicted the use of nuclear weapons

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Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard

In 1914, HG Wells wrote his prophetic novel, The Liberated World, in which he predicted the use of nuclear weapons of mass destruction and the uncontrollable consequences of this step.

Wells just wrote an instructive story about a nuclear nightmare and mass death, but perhaps the novel influenced the development of nuclear weapons. In 1932, the book was read by physicist Leo Szilard, a year later he developed the concept of a neutron chain reaction, and in 1934 received a patent.

4. “Television Network” - a film that predicted the future of television

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Hero c / f "Television Network" Howard Beal

In 1975, writer Paddy Chaefski presented his screenplay for the film “Television Network”, which told about a fictional American television company. The screenplay was immediately recognized as “insane philosophy”, but the film was shot after all.

The script turned out to be prophetic: in 1976, there was still no such abundance of reality shows, eccentric tricks on television and chasing ratings like today, and Chaafsky wrote about this. The main character of the film, Howard Beal, is experiencing a nervous breakdown on the air, and today you will not surprise anyone like that.

5. “Ralph 124 ° C 41+” - the first science fiction novel that predicted much of today's technological advances.

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“Ralph 124 ° C 41+” by Hugo Gernsbeck is a 12-part science fiction novel published in 1911 in the magazine Modern Electrics. The name "124 ° C 41+" is a pun, which means "one who foresees for everyone."

The protagonist of the novel often hints at such scientific achievements as television, electric power, videophones, transcontinental air flights, solar energy, movies with sound, synthetic milk and other food products, artificial fabric, voice printing, tape recorders and space flights.

Familiar picture?

6. “Looking back” - a book that predicted the appearance of credit cards.

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Edward Bellamy

In 1888, Edward Bellamy wrote his famous novel, “A look back,” in which he detailed the idea of ​​credit cards.

The protagonist of the book falls asleep in 1887 and wakes up in 2000. Humanity created a socialist paradise, and all citizens use credit cards to purchase goods and services (although Bellamy’s credit cards look more like modern debit cards).

Bellamy also described shopping centers and online stores, although the ordering and delivery of goods was carried out with the help of pneumatic pipes under the ground.

7. “Twilight Zone” - the series, ideas and inventions from which appeared in real life

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The series "Twilight Zone" was broadcast from 1959 to 1964, but its themes are relevant to this day. Classical science fiction, the series in several of its episodes touched on topics such as nuclear war, space exploration, state control, fears and mortality.

Many technologies in the series were presented as unique or even supernatural, have become commonplace today: cars without a driver, flat-screen TVs, entertainment for every taste, human-like robots and government control.

The Twilight Zone even predicted society’s obsession with youth and beauty and the growth of plastic surgery - episode No. 12, Look Like You, narrates this.

8. “2001: A Space Odyssey” - a film that predicted the future of space exploration.

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“2001: A Space Odyssey,” created by Arthur Clarke and Stanley Kubrick, greatly embarrassed the audience in 1968, but is now considered one of the greatest films of all time. Not only that, but also prophetic.

The film is based on the story of Arthur Clarke “Hour” - this is a story in four acts about the meetings of people with mysterious monoliths. The film and the subsequent book (both appeared in 1968) made predictions about future technological advances:
Video Conferencing. In the fictional year 2001, an incomplete videophone was shown, certainly the predecessor of Skype and FaceTime, which are commonplace these days;
The first space station appeared after the film, in 1971 it was “Salute”;
iPad - in the film, two astronauts have some kind of electronic tablet devices, very similar to Apple gadgets;
Aircraft glass cabins, space robotics, space tourism, and even anabiosis (recently approved by the FDA for medical purposes) - all of this gradually appeared and became an integral part of life. Or soon will be.

9."From Earth to the Moon in Direct Way in 97 Hours and 20 Minutes" - a novel that accurately predicted the details of the Apollo 11 crew’s moon walk

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In 1865, Jules Verne wrote “From Earth to the Moon in Direct Way in 97 Hours and 20 Minutes”. What Vern described is very similar to the manned flight to the moon, carried out by mankind 104 years later.

Both in the book and in real life, the first manned ship to the moon was sent from the USA. The shape and size of both missiles (both real and fictional) were commensurate, both had a crew of three. Both that and the other ship, after returning to Earth, fell in the Pacific Ocean.

Even more surprising, Vern even predicted the weightlessness that the crew members would experience. In the novel, a ship was fired from a cannon called “Columbiah”, and 104 years later, on July 1, 1969, the Apollo 11 command module called “Colombia” was launched.

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  • 9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future

    9 fictional stories predicting the future